Is that quick buck worth it?

No, my bank account is not full. There’s plenty of room in there, and really I could add an infinite amount of bits which equal money.

But I won’t lie or deceive people just to get those extra bits into my account. It’s not worth it.

If you use those tactics just to get more money, at some point you’re going to be found out. You’ll burn bridges and clients won’t be referring others to you. Everyone will figure out you’re not trustworthy.

Being untrustworthy means you’ll eventually run out of friends who are willing to help you, as you end up burning through new ones faster than you can replace the old ones.

That quick buck you thought you could earn is going to mean that each ‘next buck’ is harder to earn. You’ll have to dig deeper into the lies and deception to make that quick buck.

Your goal should always be honesty. If you can’t handle a job, don’t let greed cause you to lie. Tell the prospect when you can’t handle the job and send them on to someone who can. If you’re stuck, tell your client you’re stuck, then go and hire the right person to help with that portion of the project, so you’re still delivering what you promised your client.

Yup, this method may mean it takes you longer to earn that initial buck, but it will pay off in the end. You’ll get referrals and your business will start growing. Your peers will respect you and send prospects that don’t fit with them to you.

In the long term you’ll have a healthy business that people want to work with — because you’re honest and trustworthy. That’s going to translate to more earnings later and a better lifestyle.

Sure it’s harder to start that way, but honesty and integrity will build a sustainable business, not a flash in the pan.

photo credit: liwnik cc